Classroom Bulletin Boards Made EASY!

I have 5 GIGANTIC bulletin boards in my classroom. FIVE. Two of my walls have end-to-end bulletin boards. While I know that bulletin board space for some of you is a hot commodity, for me, it is almost a burden trying to fill them up.

There are SO many amazing bulletin board ideas on Pinterest, but honestly... not only do I not have the creative juices to plan for that, but I just don't have the time or the desire. We know the importance of anchor charts and how bulletin boards should serve a purpose and not just focus on the "cute factor," so how can we use this prime real estate in our classroom to showcase meaningful content?
Struggling to fill your bulletin boards with meaningful content? Check out this blog post for an easy way to create anchor charts to hang on your bulletin boards that students will actually use!  Options
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I have one bulletin board for each core subject area: reading, writing & math, and the other two I use for my class rules, calendar, Take a Break spot, student work, and more. But let's focus on the three subject boards, specifically, my math board.

My boards are big enough to hang three 24"x 36" pieces of chart paper. So on my math board, I have my Number Grid posted for student reference and two blank pieces of chart paper. One piece is labeled Vocabulary, and the other sheet is titled Concepts. I leave a space at the top of each chart to add a sticky note with the unit number, and I change that out for every unit. At the top, it says "Focus on Math" in large letters.

Love the fadeless wood bulletin board paper? Click HERE to check it out!

Then, for every new lesson, I add a sticky note or two with the concepts and vocabulary we learned. I use the larger 6" x 8" sticky notes for this. By the end of the unit, we've accumulated all sorts of concepts, strategies and vocabulary words that my students can refer to when they do their independent work. I even leave them up during tests because why not? If they are resourceful enough to refer the anchor charts, then let the kids use them!
Struggling to fill your bulletin boards with meaningful content? Check out this blog post for an easy way to create anchor charts to hang on your bulletin boards that students will actually use!  Options
Here's a close up of the Concepts anchor chart:
Struggling to fill your bulletin boards with meaningful content? Check out this blog post for an easy way to create anchor charts to hang on your bulletin boards that students will actually use!  Options
And the Vocabulary anchor chart:
Struggling to fill your bulletin boards with meaningful content? Check out this blog post for an easy way to create anchor charts to hang on your bulletin boards that students will actually use!  Options
My reading and writing boards look similar, but have additional smaller charts on construction paper that break down larger strategies.

Why This Works

I heard this question during a PD and it really struck me: Are your bulletin boards wall PAPER or wall POWER? We are definitely aiming to display wall POWER on our boards! By adding something new every day to my bulletin boards, my students are eager to see what I will add. I often create these sticky notes with the students and ask for their input for wording, diagrams, etc. Sometimes I even let my kids make the sticky notes and hang them up!

And when a student asks me a question about a strategy or vocabulary words we've learned, I can just point to my boards, and they can independently find the answer to their own question!

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Struggling to fill your bulletin boards with meaningful content? Check out this blog post for an easy way to create anchor charts to hang on your bulletin boards that students will actually use!
For more bulletin board ideas, check out my Pinterest Board.

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5 Things All Teachers Should Do Before Going Home

One of the worst feelings as a teacher is that feeling of being unprepared. And that feeling is even worse when you're hectically running around before school starts, trying to get everything ready for the day. So a few years ago, I made myself a list on a sticky note of things to do before I leave for the day and stuck it on my computer screen. It really helped to focus my efforts after school was over (so that I don't waste 15 minutes catching up on Facebook...), as well as helped me be better prepared for the next day.
One of the worst feelings as a teacher is that feeling of being unprepared. Check out this list of 5 things you can do before you go home each night, so that you can be more prepared when you start the next day.
Here are five things I do every night before I leave school:

1. Change Your Boards

Nothing makes me happier at the end of the day to erase the day's date and write tomorrow's date on the board! On my front board, I also list the tasks my students complete each morning and display our daily schedule. On the side board, I list our learning objectives for each subject.
One of the worst feelings as a teacher is that feeling of being unprepared. Check out this list of 5 things you can do before you go home each night, so that you can be more prepared when you start the next day.

2. Write Your Morning Message

My class holds a morning meeting every day, and one of the components is to write the class a message for the day. I'm embarrassed to admit I have frantically written this message while my students were completing their morning work, just a few minutes before morning meeting starts. So now, I make sure I write my morning message for the next day before I go home. That way, I make sure to include everything I want to say AND it's legible!
One of the worst feelings as a teacher is that feeling of being unprepared. Check out this list of 5 things you can do before you go home each night, so that you can be more prepared when you start the next day.

3. Stuff Mailboxes

Have you ever realized 10 minutes before dismissal that you forgot to put the math homework in mailboxes, and then frantically try to stuff mailboxes AND dismiss your class? I have. More times than I care to say... So every night before I go home, I stuff mailboxes: papers I'm passing back, homework, notes from the office, etc. I keep a tray on top of my mailboxes where I put the papers so that I'm not wandering around my classroom, trying to remember where I put that stack of papers...
One of the worst feelings as a teacher is that feeling of being unprepared. Check out this list of 5 things you can do before you go home each night, so that you can be more prepared when you start the next day.

4. Answer/Write Emails

I hate notifications, and I am not one of those teachers that lets 2,491 unread emails pile up in my inbox. So I always take a few minutes to respond and write to parents, admin, and other teachers before I leave.

5. Clean Off Your Desk

I don't claim to be Miss Organization whatsoever, but I do straighten up my teacher table a bit before I go home.

One of the worst feelings as a teacher is that feeling of being unprepared. Check out this list of 5 things you can do before you go home each night, so that you can be more prepared when you start the next day.For some reason, I always find 187 pens/pencils/markers and 12 pairs of scissors on my teacher table, among MANY other things. This was all the JUNK I found on my table today...
One of the worst feelings as a teacher is that feeling of being unprepared. Check out this list of 5 things you can do before you go home each night, so that you can be more prepared when you start the next day.
My teacher space isn't spotless; I still have my stacks of papers and books, but at least I have a clean spot to work the next day.

Depending on how organized you are, you could even take this a step further. A teacher friend of mine leaves her desk every single night with everything a sub would need in the event one of her kids gets sick and she has to call in. Now that is NOT me AT ALL, but maybe it would work for you!

In all, it takes me about 20-30 minutes to do all of these things (depending on how many emails I have to write!). But it saves me a huge amount of stress when I come in the next morning, especially on Mondays. And it allows me to settle in when I arrive and not run around like a crazy person.

What else would you add to this list? Let me know in the comments!


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One of the worst feelings as a teacher is that feeling of being unprepared. Check out this list of 5 things you can do before you go home each night, so that you can be more prepared when you start the next day.

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